Deer

Deer

For information on deer including genetics, more about the national genetics database DEERSelect, biology, deer health, reproduction, transporting deer and more.

If you're looking for information on the new velvet hygiene standards, click here >>

Velvet antler is 'the deer antler during its phase of rapid growth', and it gets the name ‘velvet‘ because of its velvet-like covering of hair.

It is important that farmers understand normal behaviour in their deer in order to manage this unique animal (in a farmed sense).
Maintaining good deer health is crucial to maximising production gains in your herd.

Reproductive productivity of the breeding herd is central to productivity to deer farming in New Zealand.

Genetics is one of the fundamental drivers of improving industry productivity. The industry is well served by a variety of commercial stud breeders and artificial breeding companies.

Weaning is the physical separation of calves from the hinds so that the calves are no longer dependent on their mothers for food (milk) and security.

Deer Facts

DINZ now publishes Deer Fact sheets. Each one is a summary of the latest information about topics relating to profitable deer farm management. Check out the Deer Facts that have been published so far >>

The current NVSB committee members

When does the hind become a priority over the calf in autumn? When should we switch our focus from weaning weight (this years production) to hind conception and mating date (next years production)?

Deer Facts

DINZ now publishes Deer Fact sheets. Each one is a summary of the latest information about topics relating to profitable deer farm management. Check out the Deer Facts that have been published so far >>

Pregnant hinds are more active during the day than at night. Set-stocking within large hill and high-country paddocks provides hinds with an environment - free from human disturbances - in which they feel relatively safe and secure. This could reduce the stress levels of hinds over the calving period, which is important for calf survival.
Over winter, hind home ranges are similar in size to those over calving and they continue to prefer pasture areas, followed by tussock, and then scrub areas.
The effective grazing area of a paddock, which excludes any large paddock areas likely to be avoided by deer, should be taken into account when selecting deer stocking rates.
Hinds travel a significant amount 1-2 days before giving birth, move very little for up to a week thereafter, then over several weeks gradually return to normal ranging behaviour.
Red deer breeding hinds each establish a specific home range, which often overlaps with others, and they also use certain preferred types of vegetation within large hill and high-country calving paddocks.
AgResearch, as commissioned by DEEResearch, has focussed on the breeding hind, with particular emphasis on habitat utilisation over the summer calving period.
This question was asked of a group 20 South Island hill and high-country farmers in 2011.

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